Rubrics for writing assignments

Image for Paper Writing Assessment Rubric from A to D

Assessment criteria are not only for professors. Reading them, you can understand what the instructor and jury want from you and improve your paper’s quality. Below are explanations on rubrics for writing assignments and the main parts constituting the essay must and must not contain. Find a feeble spot in your work and make it stronger.

The A-grade

  • Topic

The thesis clearly states the main focus of the academic paper. The author understands their work perfectly and shows profuse knowledge. Through the length of the paper, only the main and supporting topics are in focus.

  • Discussion

Perfectly ties concepts derived from different sources. Essay writer talks about difficult ideas, supporting them with sources and saturating them with own thoughts. Paragraphs are just enough; they are tied with transmissions and divided into meaningful blocks. The conclusion fuses all findings and analyzes them.

  • Sources

All references are coherent and in the right places. The evidence is enough to prove the author’s point of view, which is weaving into an authoritative opinion of scientists.

The B-grade

  • Topic

The idea and thesis are slightly out of focus. The author occasionally touches on topics that add no clearness to the requested subject. Knowledge is strong but meandering.

  • Discussion

The writer does a wonderful job of exploring complexities. Though at some point in merging knowledge, minor mistakes are possible. This also concerns the choice of sources: they can be excellent, but put in the wrong places. Some arguments lack persuasiveness.

  • Sources

A bibliography is profound and of trusted names. But the context where these names are put is slightly off track. Gaps in arguments, caused either by inattentiveness or misunderstanding.

The C-grade

  • Topic

A feeble axis of talk. The researcher strives to explain their point of view, but doesn’t know how to approach it. The message looks bulky, piled up, not clearly understandable. However, the author realizes crucial points of the subject and shows sparks of good ideas.

  • Discussion

The researcher shows a general understanding without a structure. Thoughts tangle up, contradict each other, and look incomplete. The writer possesses the knowledge but can’t join it together and leaves it chopped. As a result, arguments can’t persuade the reader.

  • Sources

Formatting issues are noticeable. There are not enough sources, and some of them are not credible. The author does not know how to support their opinion, and the defense is broken. Though the examples themselves can be good.

The D-grade

  • Topic

It’s daunting to identify the point of writing. The focus wanders from one thought to another without disclosing any. The author lacks understanding and coherence, but at least tries to summarize what they know.

  • Discussion

The paper shows no hint of structure. It does not have an idea to join the parts, or the contents simply don’t respond to it. The text is intricate, full of grammar mistakes, and impossible to read. Primarily, the author needs the motivation to go deep into the subject.

  • Sources

Few or no sources at all. Proof lies alongside statements, not joined in any way. When there are quotes, they are inappropriate or distorted. The creator needs to get a basic comprehension of the subject before getting to citations.

It doesn’t matter which grade you’re at as long as you’re determined to improve your score. Collaborate with your instructor, so they give you useful material. Ask friend students to help you, and be regularly engaged with the matter.